Former Rogers CEO Nadir Mohamed has a cool new job

Former Rogers CEO Nadir Mohamed has a cool new job

Since stepping down from the top job at Rogers Communications in 2013, after a 25-year career at the company, Nadir Mohamed has made some moves one expects from a CEO emeritus: a few high-profile directorships and a gig as CEO-in-residence at Ryerson University. Less conventionally, the 60-year-old executive has thrown himself headlong into Toronto’s frothy…

Farm animals deserve legal protection from death by fire

Farm animals deserve legal protection from death by fire

Jessica Scott-Reid is a Montreal-based freelance writer and animal advocate. In late 2013, a fire at a Quebec kennel killed 18 dogs. Owners were devastated, and animal lovers across the country were appalled to learn the boarded pets had been left unattended at the time of the blaze. In January, 2016, a stable fire in…

Unfounded: For real change, we need more than internal police reviews

Unfounded: For real change, we need more than internal police reviews

Elizabeth Sheehy is professor of law at the University of Ottawa. Teresa Scassa is the Canada Research Chair in information law at the University of Ottawa. The Globe and Mail’s investigative series Unfounded offers an unprecedented opportunity for change at the level of police investigations of sexual assault. The journalism reveals the breadth and depth…

Vancouver’s Trump Tower: The beacon of opulence and outrage

Vancouver’s Trump Tower: The beacon of opulence and outrage

Imagine waking up in your new multimillion-dollar condo, with the enviable views of the ocean and mountains, and then looking out your living-room window to discover a starkly different scene: hundreds of angry, placard-waving protesters with the look of death in their eyes staring up at you. If you are a resident of the new…

With universal drug coverage, Canadians could save billions: study

With universal drug coverage, Canadians could save billions: study

Canadians and private drug-plan sponsors could save more than $4-billion a year if the federal government adopted universal coverage for a group of commonly prescribed essential medicines, according to a new analysis in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The study, published Monday, used economic modelling to determine the government would have to spend an estimated…